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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well 3 weeks ago some guy reversed out on to the main road right in to my path… the guy didn’t even look….

Anyway the damage done wasn’t that bad to my car but his car looks like a write off

My one needs a new bonnet, driver’s wing, bumper, driver’s side indicator and light, wheel trim, and radiator.

Now I’m thinking that they are just going to write if off as the cars not worth much anymore

Anyone know the blue book value of a Saab 9000 CSE 93

Before


After


What do you think they will do?
 

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My basic understanding of common law is that you are entitled to have put right the loss you have suffered (within reason) and whilst an insurance company may say its an economic write-off you should argue your case especially if it is the other guy's fault and you are claiming off him - his insurers should be more wise about the moron they insured - You might need to get legal assistance but my advice would be to fight against them writing your car off if you are attached to it. Hope you get a result.

Mike

PS If you do not succeed, have you thought about taking the money and then offering to take the care of the insurer's hands for little or nothing(make life easy for them) in which case you can then decide what you want to do with the car?
 

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I think that your car could easely be repared. It's not so bad and i think it's possible to keep the original parts ( I mean bonnet, wing....), The light must be changed, but don't your insurance covers the broken glasses. If so, normally the front lights are covered by it, it's the case in france anyway. The parts left to change are fundable at eeuroparts.com for exemple, wich I baught things from and who are really quick and effective.
It's hard to say the real value of your car, as you may be as i'm a passionated saab owner. I know that such saabs in france, even with low mileage, haven't anymore value at all, so we find some really nice ones at around 1000 pounds.
But such a car merits, at my opinion, to be repared and enjoyed for more years, as it is a fabulous car. I can't say anything more, but I think that others in this site would give you much better advices as I can give you. Hope to know what happened, courage !!!!
 

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As a general rule, you cannot claim repair costs over and above the market value of your car.

In your case, parts and labour for replacing stuff like bonnet, fender, headlamp, etc., are unlikely to exceed the market value of your car. So relax.

It will be a different story if damage to the engine or transmission is involved as these are expensive items, repair costs of which may well exceed the market value of your car. In this event your claim will be limited to the market value.
 

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  As a general rule, you cannot claim repair costs over and above the market value of your car.  [/b]
That is not my understanding of the law - you should be no better off but no worse off either. I had this problem when some idiot wrote off my original Mini Cooper - trade value about £300 but as I had completely renovated it was worth as a classic car about £800. I have heard a legal expert subsequently say that you can insist that your own vehicle is repaired to it original condition when claiming from a third party's insurers.

Mike
 

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It's not so bad and i think it's possible to keep the original parts ( I mean bonnet, wing....), The light must be changed, but don't your insurance covers the broken glasses.[/b]
I had similar damage on my CD after crashing at Goodwood. The bodyshop I took it too straightened the bonnet and wing, filled and resprayed it and did a very acceptable job for much less than the market value of the car. I sourced good second hand lights from ppl scrapping their cars, and eventually I bought clear indicators units for it to make it purdy.

I doubt that insurers are allowed to fit second hand parts and therefore their costs would be higher.

Edited for spelling...Andrew
 

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Originally posted by Jason (Mr Torque-Steer):
[qb]I doubt that insurers are allowed to fit second hand parts and therefore their costs would be higher. [/qb][/b]
They are. This is a negotiating point. Tell the insurer that you are willing to accept s/h or recondition parts to bring repair costs down.
 

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I had a similar accident in a 900T16. there wasn't much left of the Seat but the Saab only had a dented wing, broken headlight and knackered bumper. The car was written off but I managed to buy it back for not a lot got it fixed cheaply but well and made £1000 out of the whole ordeal. The only thing to be aware of is the car will then be registered as having being beyond economic repair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Originally posted by RobS:
[qb]I had a similar accident in a 900T16. there wasn't much left of the Seat but the Saab only had a dented wing, broken headlight and knackered bumper. The car was written off but I managed to buy it back for not a lot got it fixed cheaply but well and made £1000 out of the whole ordeal. The only thing to be aware of is the car will then be registered as having being beyond economic repair. [/qb][/b]
Thanks for all the feed back guys

I have the assessors coming around on Monday to look the car over so I’ll keep ya posted

It’s funny as the car that pulled out on me was a Seat too! Not much left of it though
 

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That is not my understanding of the law - you should be no better off but no worse off either. I had this problem when some idiot wrote off my original Mini Cooper - trade value about £300 but as I had completely renovated it was worth as a classic car about £800. I have heard a legal expert subsequently say that you can insist that your own vehicle is repaired to it original condition when claiming from a third party's insurers.[/b]
There is a legal concept called "mitigation". It means that the victim must take reasonable steps to minimise his losses. In the case of an ordinary mass produced car, taking reasonable steps includes buying another car of the same or similar model and condition in the used car market (at the market price) instead of spending a greater sum on repair.

But if you've done "extra" work on your car or if it is a rare, classic car, finding an equivalent one in the 2nd hand market may be impossible or difficult. As mitigation only requires you to do the reasonable without going to the extreme (e.g., search the entire world for a similar car or even build one yourself), you can say "Well, I've tried to mitigate my losses by looking for another one in the 2nd hand market in this country, but I can't find it. I therefore have no alternative but to repair my car and claim the full repair costs, and it is reasonable for me to do so."
 

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Originally posted by M pro:
[qb]My one needs a new bonnet, driver’s wing, bumper, driver’s side indicator and light, wheel trim, and radiator.

[/qb][/b]
I hate to sound like the harbinger of doom but I fear it may be borderline... write offs generally occur at around 60%+ of book value in parts. The parts you list, if bought new from Saab, will be getting in to that area I should think. (IIRC a bonnet alone is about £500) If the assessor is from your insurers, then it's probably worth telling him that you will accept s/h parts. The normal way these things work is that if your are fully comp, you insurers approve the work, you get it done, then they recover the costs from the third party insurers.

If this is the case with you, be sure to follow it up afterwards and check that your insurers have recoverd the full amount from the third party or yor NCB may be affected.
 
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