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for a normal 9000 2.3, you should be using NGK BCPR7ES-11. For tuning you should be using NGK BCPR8ES-11. some recommend gapping these to 1mm instead of 1.1mm (the donantion of -11, means 1.1mm gap), but generally the bigger the gap the more power you will get (due to a bigger spark) although this may reduce the life of your DI.

JP
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ok thanks! in what case would i want to use the tuning (iridium?) once? Im just running normal use (non-turbo) wanting better milage :)

does the bigger gapping have any effect on fuel consumption??
 

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there isnt really any point in using iridium ones, i've heard of 400bhp 9000's that use the BCR8ES-11 ones. iridium plug would probably last longer and in some engines may give a performance benefit. but in the B234 (2.3 saab engine) there isnt any noticable difference. an iridium plug has a cooler spark which would suit some higher performance applications.

there is no point in trying to tune a non-turbo car, and i would doubt if you will see any difference in mpg between plugs. if mpg is what your concerned about do the usual things ....... dont carry any unessential weight around, clean out the air filter and dont use the A/C

JP
 

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Interesting post and so thought I'd update with a little more info. For modified 2.3.. say every 100 hp over stock NGK recommends the next step cooler in a plug to prevent engine damage or hot spots that potential contribute to knocking.
Most are running BCPR7ES running a few mods to get them to 300hp, but going up in power may warrant the BCPR8ES NGK plugs. So how about a quick review of what those letters mean if not already discussed ..

The "BC" represents the 5/8" socket drive needed to install; the "P" for protrusion into the cylinder for better combustion and the "R" for resistive preventing frequency interference on sound equipment. Each step up from 6(stock plugs).. represent about 100F or 37.7C in temp reduction. Always better to error on the side of running cooler plugs.. essentially to mean that if not hot enough, plug fowling may occur at lower rpm or cruising around town.

Could not find the holy grail of a "BCPR8ES" plugs for a modified 2.3 producing over 400hp.. .. suggest going with NGK PFR8S8EG as a suitable replacement in double platinum form. It's a protrusion style that is resistive, runs 5/8" socket drive to install and runs step 8 in temp reduction.

Most of this info comes from NGK research .. but hope it helps.
 

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You must use a resistor plug with the DIC as far as I know. Other than that, anything fancier than copper is a waste of money unless you are heavily tuning your setup with more boost, larger turbo, etc. The "colder steps" have to do with the profile of the ground strap, electrode and how much ceramic is exposed into the combustion chamber. The more hot material that is physically inside the mixture charge, the more likely it is to ignite out-of-timing( without spark ). This is called detonation and is the main reason engines fail. If all of the valves are closed when it happens, that gas is going to find a way out. Usually by forcing the piston down against its will or pushing the head up and ripping the head gasket.
 
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