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The Haynes manual correctly identifies the single rear jacking point just below the bumper, where the loop for attaching a tow is located. For clarity, this is the right hand no 1 point on the diagram.

Mark
 

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Thats where I was jacking my car up one day,till I guy I know who fixes my car (sometimes),said "oh god no!,don't ever jack it there,that's a weak point,put it right under at the axle that'll do it".
I said bugger off I'm not putting it there,I'll do something to it,the weight or this thing on a bloody axle,get you head t/gether,I ended up putting it where it's supposed to go,yes at the indentation behind the towbar that it's designed for.
I tell you he maybe quite,and I do say "quite" a good mechanic with something's,but not all!!,no way.And this is the same guy who said he'd help me convert my BM to manual,nope don't think so he wont be near it
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. I am reading the Haynes manual correctly.

The reason I say its an impossible location is that my standard £30 1.5 to 2 ton trolley jack just doesn't have the extension to even reach the jacking point let alone lift it. I did notice a reinforcement plate under the spare wheel footwell, that was scratched as thought it had been used in the past.

What make of trolley jack do you have ?
 

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JFP, my lowered '96 Aero is a tight squeeze to get the trolley jack under the official front and rear jacking points. I jack each side of the rear up separately, under the pivot where the trailing arm joins the subframe, just in front of the wheel. Then I put an axle stand just inboard of the jacking point on the sill (clear of the "clips" so I don't squash them, and just where Haynes recommends). Then I remove the jack and do the other side.

I do something similar at the front, but jack under the circular hole in the plate just to the rear of the rear wishbone bush.

rst99, do the same thing with the standard jack, using the standard jacking points and making sure, obviously, that the axle stands don't stop you from getting the jack out.

In both cases, it is strongly recommended to chock the wheels that are still on the ground. And remember only to raise one end of the car at a time. The instructions with my (Halfords) axle stands state this explicitly.

I try to avoid opening the doors above the axle stands, as it is obvious when you try it that the sill is bending slightly under the load and opening and closing the door results in some binding.
 

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JFP, I place a block of wood between the jack and underbody, always' when using the trolley jack, to protect the car metal. Doing this might give you the lift you need. I also sometimes place the jack wheels on a block for extra lift. Must be a good solid block though; *never* a brick!
 

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2 or 4 wedge shaped pieces of wood are an ideal way to get a good start before starting to jack. I cannot drive up my ramps without them.
Pieces of 3"x6" timber with a wedge on one end to allow you to slowly drive either 2 or 4 wheels onto them are invaluable with low slung cars. I recommend each one is about 2'long and can be second hand from a salvage yard. The only hard part is cutting the wedge which can be done with a long hand saw. Such a cut across 6" requires an industrial size power saw so a little exercise is in order.

Also very handy for my MGV8.
 
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