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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone seen the 2008 Sportwagon with a towbar fitted?
I want to fit a towbar to mine but the rear bumper seems deeper than on previous models and I think that there may be a visible cut-out, even with a Witter or Bosal vertical detachable bar.
I don't want to spoil the back end of the car.

Kev.E :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Ok, very little info on tow bars available, especially for ’57 plate onward facelift models and virtually no pictures to be had except for a few forum contributors to whom I am very grateful.
I wanted a tow bar that would not spoil the look of the car and did not have a visible cut-out when viewed from the rear of the vehicle.

After a bit of research and e-mails to Saab, Witter and Bosal (only Saab replied but were unable to produce any images of their tow bar installed on a vehicle) I ordered a Witter Quantum Detachable tow bar assembly at a cost of £203.22 inc VAT & delivery from Towequipe.com.
• Part No. SB29AQ a - Witter tow bar Detach Tow bar Saab 93 Est 05 ONSB29AQ
It was delivered extremely quickly and I was pleased with the quality of the assembly, the steelwork comes in a very neatly finished black primer, all parts are accurately cut and it looks strong. The detachable kit (included) is also a very impressive piece of equipment and well made.
I took time over the last week since delivery to give the tow bar steelwork multiple coats of paint in an attempt to extend it’s life and stave off the effects of winter’s salty roads, I intend to keep this car for a long time and hate to see a rusty tow bar spoiling a car’s good looks.

I ordered genuine Saab electrics from Peter O’Caroll at [email protected]. Very helpful and quick, I’ll definitely go back to this gentleman for parts.
An added bonus is that if you know the part number you can get the price from the website.
Part Nos. 12803356 Trailer Module Control Unit. £33.78 and 12785959 Cable Harness Kit with 13 pin euro socket. £68.37 (+ VAT & delivery).

I chose genuine electrics because I did not want to tamper with the car’s wiring as it’s still under the manufacturer’s warranty and because I heard that the genuine electrics automatically shut off the reverse parking sensors and rear fog lights when you plug a trailer in. I will test this and post results as soon as I know.

So first step was to remove the rear bumper, this was held by 3 screws at each wheel arch, 2 plastic M6 nuts underneath the wheel well and a clip below each rear light cluster which was released using a thin flat bladed screwdriver inserted into a hole which is visible when the hatch is up, then pull the wheel arches outwards and slide the bumper rearwards.
Do not forget to unplug reverse parking sensors inside the Rear Electrical Center and push the grommet out so you can withdraw the cable with the bumper.

Once the bumper is off you can see the rear aluminium beam with the holes for tow bar mounting, behind that hides the grommet which blanks the hole for the cable harness to pass through.

P1040247(1).jpg

Next thing is to loosely fit and assemble the tow bar steelwork on the car, begin with the cross brace which is furthest underneath (across the bottom of the wheel well) and held in place with 2 bolts which screw into the car’s own threaded mountings.
Then hang the main bracket using 4 bolts and spacer plates from the aluminium beam.
I’ve put some strips of mastic sealant between the steelwork and the aluminium beam to try and prevent or limit any electrolytic corrosion that may occur in this area, most of it squeezes out when tightening/torquing the bolts but a thin film may remain and prevent any moisture getting to this area.

P1040249(1).jpg

On the estate fit the spacer between the main bracket and cross brace and secure these together with the M16 bolt (spacer not required for saloon models).

P1040280(3).jpg

The female part of the detachable coupling fits neatly into the main bracket and is held using 4 bolts of which 1 or 2 on the left hand side are used to secure the electrical socket plate, spacer washers are provided to pack out the bolts which are not used to secure the socket plate, preventing the bolts from interfering with the fit of the detachable part.
I fitted the socket plate on one bolt and at an angle rather than vertically to make it less visible and hopefully easier to get the plug in and out.

P1040277(1).jpg

At this point it is advised to plug in the detachable tow ball part and check vertical alignment before tightening and torquing all the bolts. There is a small amount of play available prior to tightening them and it is important to get this part installed vertically.

The Cable Harness Kit is pretty much plug & play as it’s pre-wired at both ends and you only have to feed the plug through the rear panel and insert it into the socket in the Rear Electrical Centre, the Trailer Module plugs into a socket right next to it (see photos).

P1040259(1).JPG

P1040262(1).jpg

P1040263(3).jpg

I had to temporarily secure the socket with cable ties as there were no bolts supplied with the tow bar or electrics kit, I’ll have to get 3 x M5 by 40mm screws and nuts to secure it to the socket plate.

NOTE. You need to fit a 20 Amp mini fuse to the Rear Electrical Centre circuit No.8 to feed the permanent live on socket pin 9.

I did some measuring around the tow bar assembly and marked out some lines on the inside of the bumper, Saab have very thoughtfully provided lines moulded into the bumper for their own tow bar cutout and these helped with centering and alignment, these can be seen in the photo.
The corners of the cutout were drilled making it easy to get the jigsaw blade turned and also hopefully prevent any cracks forming and running.

P1040269(1).jpg

A trial fit of the bumper showed I had plenty of clearance around the area for insertion and release of the detachable part and connection of the electrical plug.

P1040299(1).jpg

I gave all the nuts, bolts and scrapes a hefty dose of paint and fitted the bumper back into position with no problems whatsoever.

Plugging into a towing electrics tester showed all functions working correctly.

Result? I’m delighted with this tow bar, it looks solid. The tow ball is easy to fit and remove, once locked in it feels solid with no movement at all.
From the rear of the vehicle the most noticeable thing is the cross brace which after all is a dirty great lump of angle bar and cannot be concealed but it’s a small price to pay for an otherwise unobtrusive installation.

P1040288(1).jpg
 

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I know this is reviving a very old topic. But, I have a problem with the Saab fitted towbar on my '07 Sportwagon. The ball height is 470mm at the centre of the ball. This is way too high for towing my caravan. I was wondering what ball height the Witter detachable you have fitted here is? Measured at the centre of the ball to the ground.

Many thanks.
 

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I've got the same Witter detachable on my 08 Sportwagon. Just been out and put the ball on and it's 15" or 38cm from the centre of the ball to the ground.
Conal
 

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hi there can any body help me Ive just fitted a tow bar on my Saab 93 2005 and the plug in electrics its the electrics i have a problem with Ive plugged in the plug and the trailer controller and plunged in a trailer board and everything works great but when i unplug the trailer board and put the indicators on they flash really fast both sides .the only thing that i haven't connected is the single cable that is about half way down that is single on its own as i don't know where it goes please help:confused:
 

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Blinkers flash faster when a lamp is out on that side. The flasher unit is designed to the resistance of the lamps (setting aside nominal wiring impedance).

Disconnecting a trailer would make no difference to the disconnected situation unless the trailer load was substituting enough for a faulty car flasher to seem normal when hooked-in. Before wiring for a trailer it's wise to check the signals all work 100% on the car itself.

I have no idea what wire you are talking about but my first step would be to measure it for voltage to see whether...in the 'everyday test' whether it is not a possible short circuit. hooking it to chassis makes any difference. There are standards ...not always complied-with for the wiring of trailer. There are occasionally location variations. This may assist to type in "colour coding and connections for trailer wiring diagram" and the first response....already showing colours has copious information.

Common place errors in new wiring are pin connection errors and 'earthing' errors...for example wrongly choosing white brown or black or simply choosing wrong pins. Some people think a short to a disused pin on the car side is not a problem...it may be Shorts are not uncommon from 'rough as guts' work.

In your case with all new connections to trailer plug 'disconnected my first move would be flashing problem on 'one side or both sides'?. Check lamps then disconnect right back to square one and check for flashing. Look for any wiring damage on car side where you worked and then check the flasher unit....maybe by using another flasher. If flasher is faulty one would normally imagine both sides will show same defect. You can check voltages well enough using an analogue multimeter (on 50v dc scale) and see whether the deviation at each trafficator light is same when blinking. A 'digital 'meter is useless for that as response time is too slow.
 

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Blinkers flash faster when a lamp is out on that side. The flasher unit is designed to the resistance of the lamps (setting aside nominal wiring impedance).

Disconnecting a trailer would make no difference to the disconnected situation unless the trailer load was substituting enough for a faulty car flasher to seem normal when hooked-in. Before wiring for a trailer it's wise to check the signals all work 100% on the car itself.

I have no idea what wire you are talking about but my first step would be to measure it for voltage to see whether...in the 'everyday test' whether it is not a possible short circuit. hooking it to chassis makes any difference. There are standards ...not always complied-with for the wiring of trailer. There are occasionally location variations. This may assist to type in "colour coding and connections for trailer wiring diagram" and the first response....already showing colours has copious information.

Common place errors in new wiring are pin connection errors and 'earthing' errors...for example wrongly choosing white brown or black or simply choosing wrong pins. Some people think a short to a disused pin on the car side is not a problem...it may be Shorts are not uncommon from 'rough as guts' work.

In your case with all new connections to trailer plug 'disconnected my first move would be flashing problem on 'one side or both sides'?. Check lamps then disconnect right back to square one and check for flashing. Look for any wiring damage on car side where you worked and then check the flasher unit....maybe by using another flasher. If flasher is faulty one would normally imagine both sides will show same defect. You can check voltages well enough using an analogue multimeter (on 50v dc scale) and see whether the deviation at each trafficator light is same when blinking. A 'digital 'meter is useless for that as response time is too slow.

This might interst you or those like ou...https://www.saablink.net/forum/general-ng900-old-9-3-posts-information/43998.htm.... My impression is that something done may have the computer thinking a lamp is out!!...by the way black is less likely to be the negative than white. Black is tyopically the reversing light. Search internet for trailer wiring diagrams...some are very informatie, from memory.
 
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