Saabscene Saab Forum - Saab Technical Information Resource banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Help !

I was out this afternoon working (what I really mean is cruising)

Was giving my car some stick down a narrow track in first gear, up to red line and then letting the revs fall back again....anyway, arrived at my destination (end of lane), switched off for approx 5 mins, turned around and headed off, when I restarted the car, I got a puff of blue foul smelling smoke from the exhaust, smelt like burnt oil....

Anyway, drove him quite sedately, checked all the pipes for leaks, temp gauge, water level etc, nothing amiss.

I gave the car a nice bootful when back home, with no smoke from exhaust, no lack of boost, nothing untoward at all.

Can anyone suggest why this way of happened ? is it likely to be a turbo on its last legs ?

Cheers, hoping for good news !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
IIRC, worn turbos usually give a puff of smoke as you come to a stop. Blue smoke on startup can mean oil leaking down into the cylinder from the valve guides or valve stem oil seals.

Giving it a good thrashing might just have got the oil thin enough to allow a few drops to get through. Keep an eye out for it and see if it happens again.

Regards,
Alan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It seemed like an oil residue was left somewhere after the thrashing and was just being burnt off on start up, it certainly didnt smoke at all under load...

The oil and filter was last changed 4000miles ago, might be time for another change, was using shell helix
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Thrashing the turbo and then switching off is never a good idea as I'm sure you know, best to let it idle for a couple of minutes or at least drive gently.

Can't remember why though - I think it's to make sure there's always oil in it when spinning or something?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,895 Posts
Originally posted by fliptopbin:
[qb]Can't remember why though - I think it's to make sure there's always oil in it when spinning or something? [/qb][/b]
In order to circulate cooler oil and water (where applicable) in order to cool down the turbo. If the turbo's red hot (sometimes literally) when the engine is shut down, the oil in the turbo will boil and turn to sludge, not very good for the turbine bearings which will inevitably seize if the action is repeated frequently.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top