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Just bought a set of NGK's for my 1996 CSE 2.3T. Can't find the Pt No on any Saab documents I've got and Haynes only list Champion.
Eurocarparts gave me BCPR7ES-11, can anyone confirm these are the right ones?
Cheers.
 

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If the 9000 is the same as the 9-3, the plugs gap spec. is 0.9mm - 1.1mm. For longer plug life you are therefore better off gapping the plugs closer to 0.9mm. If you leave them at 1.1mm they soon go out of spec.

I have heard various dealers complain of Trionic 5 'eating plugs' and I'm sure it's because they lob 'em in straight out of the box on the top end of the gap spec.
 

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I just bought a set of said NGK plugs. They were gapped at 0.9mm out of the box and not the expected 1.1mm.
I've put them in at 0.9mm, but I may regap to 1.0mm and see how they perform. (They are performing much better at 0.9mm than the 1.4mm gapped ones I took out!)
 

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If the 9000 is the same as the 9-3, the plugs gap spec. is 0.9mm - 1.1mm. For longer plug life you are therefore better off gapping the plugs closer to 0.9mm. If you leave them at 1.1mm they soon go out of spec.

I have heard various dealers complain of Trionic 5 'eating plugs' and I'm sure it's because they lob 'em in straight out of the box on the top end of the gap spec.[/b]
Julian, don't mean to rebut your point, but correct plug gap is very important on a Trionic car, there is this quote from Dr Boost who heads trionic development at Saab in Sweden on Saabnet.com :

This is the full thread : http://www.saabnet.com/tsn/bb/performance/....html?bID=54665

Simple....(I'll give you the short version, it's late here in Sweden)
A wider gap will of course produce a longer spark.
As you know that air/fuel mixture needs to be exposed of the HOT spark, the HEAT will start the flame.
The larger area of exposure the better, "as a general rule of thumb".
As the pressure raise, during hi boost conditions, the voltage need will also raise. IF you have got an ignition system with too low voltage, there will be no combustion, since there will be no spark across the gap.
I have had NO probs with the plugs gapped to 1.10 mm, even at H/O applications, well that is if 350 bhp is H/O for you....
 
Last but not least, there is no connection between having the plugs gapped to 1.10 and premature DI failure.
No Connection.
Do I make myself clear enought ?   :)
The 1.10 (compared with 0.85) will NOT make the DI cassette to work harder.
I tried to explain that earlier last week or so, see if you can find that thread, or else ask again[/b]
 

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From reading Julians comment and reading yours, MarkA, I am not sure that you are saying different things.

The Saab guy is saying that plug gap of 1.1mm is fine and that gap does not make DI work harder nor lead to premature failure (not that I have read that here, anyway)

Julian is saying that gapping at 0.9mm means that as the plug gap opens up over time they will be within the spec of 0.9mm to 1.1mm. If you start at 1.1mm then they will open to something wider and out of specified range.

I am not making any judgement here, just giving my interpretation of what has been said.
 

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I have posted this before, but here it is again, useful info on why you should use NGK:

ONLY USE NGK PLUGS!

Hope this info helps:

Guide for Direct Ignition cassette and spark plug service - all DI-equipped vehicles

Using non-resistor spark plugs could cause several different types of fault symptoms and driveability problems in the car. The DI uses the spark plugs are used to monitor the combustion process.

An incorrect spark plug gap (excessive wear) can also lead to driveability problems. Use of non-resistor spark plugs could also destroy the DI cassette.

! - Spark plug burn-off - !
Automatic spark plug burn-off is carried out with a burst of sparks each time the engine is switched off. Burn-off is carried out in all cylinders simultaneously and lasts for 5 seconds at a rate of 210 sparks per second.

! -This Is Lethal Current Use Extreme Caution- !

Therefore, it is very important to adhere to the following guidelines :

When replacing the spark plugs it's important to check following:

- First Allow 30 seconds for the module to power down then remove the electrical plug to ensure your safety.
- Always use resistor type NGK spark plugs. All Saabs equipped with DI cassettes have been specified with resistor type NGK plugs
- Verify the correct gap at the electrode (1.0mm -1.1mm)
- Check For oil leakage from coil assemblies. This would indicate a failed DI assembly.

Before installation of the DI cassette:

Coat the rubber boots on the cassette with Krytox (P/N 30 19 312) or a name brand dielectric grease.
Check to be sure that the contact springs can be seen inside the coil towers and replace them if they are damaged or missing ( P/N 91 67 032)
Coat the thread of the spark plugs with Molycote 1000 (P/N 30 20 271) or high temperature anti-sieze.

Torque:

Install and torque the Spark plugs to 21 lbf ft
Fit the Cassette to the valve cover and torque to 8.1 lbf ft

Spark plug considerations

"7" series spark plugs have a colder heat range than "6" series and are, therefore, commonly used as an alternative plug on cars consistently run at high speeds or under heavy loads.

"R" in the NGK plug designation signifies resistor type.
 

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Another thing to remember is that the sparkplugs also act as test probes so that Trionic knows what's happening in each cylinder...

When DrBoost is saying that the car runs better with the gap set to 1.1mm I don't see any reason for not using his advise - he is after all working with the Trionic system every day
 

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John's right - I am not saying don't run plugs at 1.1mm gap. I am saying that Saab specify a tolerance band on plug gaps, presumably to give optimum operation. Therefore it makes sense to start at the lower end of the range to get maximum life out of the plug.


Oh and I phoned Saab - they've never heard of a Dr. Boost
 

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Originally posted by dicreamio:
[qb]I guess I can assume even Bosch plugs are no good?.
   [/qb][/b]
For safety's sake, yes, that is the correct assumption. The key element in the NGK spec is the "R", standing for "resistor", which is key to the successful operation and longevity of the DI system. There are undoubtedly other manufacturers who make resistor spark plugs, but they're yet to become widely known in the Saab world if they do make a compatible one... the only upgrade I know of is the NGK platinum range, which offer longer life and more consistent performance.
 

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Originally posted by Friberg:
[qb]When DrBoost is saying that the car runs better with the gap set to 1.1mm I don't see any reason for not using his advise[/qb][/b]
I do follow that advice, but I am happy to check the plugs on my Aero regularly to make sure they don't get too wide. Many people (including Saab dealers) will simply follow the Saab service schedule which, unbelievably, doesn't recommend checking the spark plug gaps at all between changes at 36,000 mile intervals. Under these conditions, it is safer to start at the minimum setting and hope that after 36K miles, they're still within spec.

When I bought my CSE, it had a full Saab dealer service history, yet the plug gaps were at about 1.4mm and the DI cartridge was in a poor state (would hardly tolerate any boost at all when I tried it on my Aero).

Also, although I've heard many people say that the "-11" signifies a pre-gap of 1.1mm, my experience is that they are always slightly less than that. I have noticed, however, that the "-11" have a longer earth electrode than the "normal" plugs and I wonder whether the "-11" simply means that the plugs are designed to keep the earth electrode roughly parallel to the end of the centre electrode at gaps up to 1.1mm (which is quite a large gap).
 

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Originally posted by Mark E:
[qb]I change mine every 6000 miles... but then they probably have a harder life than most          :fawlty:  [/qb][/b]
Yeah... for the once like us who are driving tuned Saabs the spark plugs don't last very long. 10000km/6000 miles are a good time to change.
 

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Cheers for the info, I think my DI might already be on its way out. The last time the code reader/diagnostic tool was hooked upto it, it was throwing up an error which pointed to a DI fault.

Its great the way some people in parts stores just throw out whatever is handy and matches the part number on their books. Its not their fault when companies must be listing their parts as compatable for saabs... when they are obviously not.
 
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