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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got a shipment of a few things I ordered. Among them were wiper blades, tires, and oil. Nothing special about the wiper blades, but I'm curious what everyone thinks about the tires and the oil.

The tires are Eagle F1 GS-D3's ... and the oil is AMSOIL 0W-30 series 2000. But enough words, how about some pictures and diagrams?



The tires were rated very well on TireRack.com and have a 280 treadlife rating. They certainly look pretty good for combined dry and wet driving.






At over $8 a quart that oil isn't cheap. But it's still cheaper than Saab synthetic, and if Saab synthetic is based off Mobil 1 it should do the part just as well if not better. My best frind since childhood and his father run it in everything they own. After seeing their engines pulled apart even after 150K miles and still seeing the original cross hatching in the cyllinder bores, I was quite impressed. It's good stuff!

So let's get some input! What do you all think about the tires/oil? Good choice?

We also may be buying some new Ronal wheels for the Viggen as the stock wheels keep getting bent over and over and new wheels are looking to be cheaper than continuing to fix the bent wheels.


Cheers,
Dubbya~
 

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Yep I have had those same tires under my viggen since spring and I really like them. Grip could always be better, but prefer these since they do not wear down so quickly.
 

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Well, the tires get
I'll need to replace my SZ-50's because they've been discontinued and I'll probably use these as replacement.

The Amsoil is good oil. They use high quality base stocks and, IIRC, does have a high concentration of esters, but is essentially a PAO (polyalphaolephin) based oil. I've read that it does give substantial increase in fuel efficiency, too. However, there are synthetics that are just as good at half the price. I like using M1 15W-50 in my B234R. I've had oil analysis done on this oil w/7500 mile drain intervals and it gave very good numbers for wear rate (see link below). It may not give the fuel efficiency that the Amsoil gives, but at twice the cost I'm content with getting 26 mpg rather than 27.5. One last point, it's pretty common knowledge that saab turbos are pretty tough on oil. I wouldn't put any 0W oil in my engine - too thin - but that's my preference and I know others swear by it. BITOG-Used Oil Analysis
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was a little hesitant to put in a 0 weight oil. But as you can see with the wear scar comparison, it's not below par when it comes to standard 5 and 10 weight oils.

I also felt a little more comfortable with the knowledge that the Viggen uses pistons with a moly anti-friciton coating on the skirts to prevent excessive wear. It should resist galling (sp?) quite well, and I can't see the factory Mobil based stuff doing a great deal better.

My real concern was more with the oil getting burnt in the turbo. AMSOIL seems to be one of the more heat resistant oils though, and the Series 2000 is supposed to be their latest and most up-to-date stuff.

If I ever upgrade the car in any serious way I'd use the AMSOIL racing 20W-50.

Here are some interesting related oil comparison links (take with a grain of salt, they appear to be un-biased, but most are AMSOIL comparisons, so you never really know):

http://www.1st-in-synthetics.com/10W30API.htm

http://www.amsoil.com/performancetests/amsoil_vs_mobil1.htm

http://www.authorized-amsoil-dealer-for-...-the-dynometer/

http://www.performanceoiltechnology.com/Amsoilvs.Mobil1.htm

Hopefully the real life performance will be as good as it was on my friend's cars. (One of which was turbo, and the other a Formula Ford race car.)



Dubbya~
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Also, not to sound overly-defensive (just was doing some number crunching) ... but a difference of 1.5 mpg over the course of 10,000 mile oil change intervals would make a pretty good difference in cost to me.

At 26 mpg I use 384 gallons every 10,000 miles. Since the cost of premium fuel is $2.40 a gallon here on the West Coast I spend $923 in gas between 10,000 mile oil changes.

If I were to get only 1.5 mpg better my cost would be reduced to $873 every 10,000 miles. That saves me $50, which is actually more than I pay for the oil in the first place.

In Britain, where the cost of gas is nearly the equvalent of $5 a gallon and the relative cost of oil about the same, the AMSOIL might make an even more noticable difference.

Not a bad deal if you ask me. I've seen those sorts of numbers with AMSOIL before on fuel efficiency.

Probably still best to use a heavyweight oil in a highly modded car past 300 hp ... or on trackdays. But on a stock or near stock daily driven car, it should work pretty darn well methinks.


Dubbya~
 

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Originally posted by Adrian W:
[qb] Since the cost of premium fuel is $2.40 a gallon here on the West Coast  [/qb][/b]
That must be tough Adrian, we get ours here for about $6.50 a gallon
 

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Adrian, what concerns me with the 0W, at least on my B234R, are the oil nozzles that spray the underside of the pistons. Especially on the B234R which can develop tremendous amounts of torque at relatively low rpm's. I'm skeptical that a 0W can supply enough oil pressure to keep those undersides oiled in high-load, high-torque, low-rpm conditions. Not that I go around lugging my engine - I usually keep it in a gear that has my rpm's above 2500. Maybe I'm just a creature of habit, too - I used to use Kendall GT 20W-50, before they were bought/merged, and thought it was great to use in my 99's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Originally posted by robert lavergne:
[qb]Adrian, what concerns me with the 0W, at least on my B234R, are the oil nozzles that spray the underside of the pistons.  Especially on the B234R which can develop tremendous amounts of torque at relatively low rpm's.  I'm skeptical that a 0W can supply enough oil pressure to keep those undersides oiled in high-load, high-torque, low-rpm conditions.  Not that I go around lugging my engine - I usually keep it in a gear that has my rpm's above 2500.  Maybe I'm just a creature of habit, too - I used to use Kendall GT 20W-50, before they were bought/merged, and thought it was great to use in my 99's. [/qb][/b]
Those should be ok as many cars, including the C900's, Subarus, and many older Chryslers were designed without them all together. Remember also that once the engine warms up it's the 30 that's meaningfull. And aside from the fact that you shouldn't be hard on your engine when it's cold, AMSIOL still did very well in the cold start wear tests. The low viscosity also allows it to get up into your bearings from the sump more quickly which, on an overhead cam engine, can be vital.

I'll put in a quote from the great oil debate thread's link:

"Keep in mind that the second number of an oil's viscosity grade (30 in this case) is the steady weight of the oil when at 100 degrees C (212 degrees F) and it compares with any other 30 weight grade oil, in thickness, regardless whether it's a 0W-30, 5W-30 or 10W-30. This is a A.S.E standard test which must be passed to be called a particular viscosity grade oil. (Don't let the "0W" verses the more common 5W or 10W confuse you.) This particular oil's ability to remain a 30 weight oil in very abusive engine temperatures at well over 150 degrees C (302 degrees F) allows it to be a strong and safe oil for street, strip and track."

Dubbya~
 
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