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For anyone who wants to remove the swirl flaps on their TTID pls see below. I did this on my 2008 TTiD last weekend, its on 84k, and well looked after.

I think I got lucky...

I found a partially broken flap on cylinder 1. Nearly half of it was missing, with the rest hanging on its post / jammed into the roof of the port. Must have gone through the system without any damage. Some images below...

I've heard failure is rare on the TTiD, and a new design from 2010 (not sure whats changed), but clearly it seems that it could be risky to leave them in place. They are flimsy, and mine were sliding up and down their posts whereas I think they should be locked in place by a couple of nodes on the shaft that holds them. Whilst there aren't any dodgy spot welds or screws holding the flap, clearly they still fail (the flap has a channel which the shaft goes through to hold it). Not surprising these fail really, must be a lot of vacuum, heat, and pressure waves as well as oil & exhaust gas etc.

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Here's flap #1, well, whats left of it.

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Flaps 1 through 4.

There's no blanking kit for this manifold that I know of, and I know others have used a 10p coin to blank off. I yanked off the all the flaps and re-inserted the original shaft and sealing plate back on. The shaft to me seemed rock solid. I was happy to take the risk on this, but please choose your own solution if you think necessary.

DSC_0185.jpg

WARNING: Its probably the most tedious and fiddly job I've ever done on a car, I was cursing the designers of this engine from start to finish. Clearly not a part they were expecting to be removed/serviced. I've worked a lot on my petrol B207R, which in comparison is a breeze. It's not a difficult job, just awkward and time consuming, budget up to 10 hrs (less if you know Z19DTR well, I dont.), including time to sort the flaps on the manifold. This isn't a super detailed guide, I might have missed the odd minor step, so I'm assuming some knowledge of the car/engine. If you need any more info PM me, happy to help any time.

Things you'll need: Blu-tack, magnetic retriever (awkward nuts easy to lose down nooks and crannies), torx drive set, ribe drive set, small hose and bucket to collect coolant, small jubilee clip (16-22mm), rags for any diesel spill, good flexi universal joint type socket driver

Remove battery, battery tray, air filter box and cover under radiator/spoiler

Drain coolant using drain valve on radiator

Remove cambelt cover, keep 2 of the bolts handy

Turn engine over until two of the holes on the diesel pump pulley are at 10 and 2 o'clock

Use the 2 cambelt cover bolts to lock the fuel pump pulley so it doesn't move.

DSC_0169.jpg

Remove coolant pipe from rear of inlet manifold (held with a spring clip) which gives space for the fuel pump to come out.

Remove the plate which holds the engine lift eye (and attached black wiring connection plate) that sits by the fuel pump

Remove the bracket at the rear of the engine, near the alternator, which holds the wiring looms in place (3 x 10mm bolts)

Remove the steel oil breather pipe which runs across the top of the engine to oil trap.

Unbolt 2 x 10mm nuts on the return fuel reservoir and remove the 3.5mm rubber return fuel hose that passes to it from the injectors

Remove connector on the fuel pump. Unscrew 3 x 12mm nuts from the rear of the pump. Stuff a rag under the pump it so you don't lose any of the nuts as space is tight and fiddly. Blu tack on your sockets is handy.

Remove the steel high pressure fuel pipe running from the pump the the fuel rail (2 x union nuts). Important - Plug the fuel ports so no [email protected] gets in

Carefully un-do the large fuel pump pulley nut (22mm iirc) by 2 or 3 turns. Using a drift tap the bolt to push the input shaft of the pump out slowly. Turn a bit more, tap a bit more until the shaft is free. NOTE: you might have a woodruff key or clip on the shaft which will drop out so look out for this. It will be located at 7 o'clock on the shaft. This helps it mate with the pulley. I lost mine (i think) there was only a dowel on my shaft where it looks like some type of key would locate, but seems it works fine even without it. Others on the forum may know otherwise.

Lay pump and return reservoir where the air box would be.

Using 2 x m8 nuts mated together unwind and remove the fuel pump retaining bolt that is nearest to the inlet manifold

Remove all coil plug connectors

Remove all bolts holding the wiring loom that sits on top of the engine

Un-plug and remove EGR valve

Remove metal EGR pipe which runs into the manifold (watch for the metal gasket)

Un clip and remove the narrow ridged coolant pipe that runs down near the EGR valve

Remove large intake hose that runs to throttle body

Un-plug and remove throttle body

Now the EGR cooler body itself needs to be moved (don't need to remove it, just move out slightly) to allow the inlet manifold to come out. This sits behind the thermostat: 2 x long bolts and 2 x nuts hold this in place. Unplug the narrow vacuum hoses, and the lower large coolant hose connected to it.

Fiddly bit: there is a plate below the EGR cooler which holds some wiring but blocks it from moving outwards. This is held in place by 1 x E18 torx bolt. Its is tricky to see/reach/undo, I think worse if you have an auto box like mine which is bulky unit. Flexi universal joint driver is needed. Unwind this bolt a few turns, just enough to allow the EGR cooler to move out an inch or so. If this bolt comes off I reckon it would be a ball ache to get back in place.

Remove the oil trap, 3 bolts iirc, one low down on cylinder block. Pull the lower pipe of the oil trap out of the block, push the whole thing back to make space.

Move the black bracket on starter motor housing which holds some wiring, 2 x 13mm bolts iirc, again this partly blocks the EGR / manifold

Now remove the nuts holding the inlet manifold in place, there's 1 bolt at the top of the manifold near the throttle.

Finally with the wiring all loose, and the EGR pulled out slightly, you should be able to wiggle out the manifold through the mash up of wires and hoses! Whilst doing so unplug the connector to the swirl flap actuator. (its located underneath so a pain to unplug until more accessible/visible)

Detach the swirl flap motor and actuator arm. Unscrew flap ports, rotate the flap to align with entry/exit slots inside the inlet port and pull out the flap and spindle/shaft.

Reverse steps above to re-assemble. Before re-starting turn the ignition key a few times to run the pump in the fuel tank which will bleed air in the fuel system, it should then kick to life after a few turns of the crank. Hope this helps, good luck...
 

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Excellent Raj:thumbsup:

just a few pointers and to echo what raj has said here........

clean out manifold at same time.....it will make a difference inc cleaning of the tb and map sensor.

do allow enough time to do the job..........especially if you have not done one before if unsure ask or get someone to do it for you !!

recommended to do timing belt and water pump at same time......if recently done ensure you mark the belt rotation before you remove it so can be put back on the same !! and timing is correct for which a tool is available for around £20


recommended to renew any gaskets and O rings and clean mating surfaces

use a torque wrench if you have one

the actuator still needs to remain present and electrically connected..........although the rod can be disposed of

recommended to clean out oil/catch can check condition of all pipes for deterioration/clean

the first one did was done by just removing the flap as raj has done.............that was 3yrs+ ago and without faults today. there are several options of doing so so no hard and fast rules on this.

to finish..... this is I feel to the diy mechanic a moderate to difficult job to carry out but is within the capabilities of most if time and care are taken undertaking the job.
I can assure you that this is not detrimental to the running of the car and can confirm ive done more bmw's I care to think of, the same with the tid/cdti engines (in which there is a kit available) and a handful of ttids with no adverse effects nor come backs in fact only positive results.
 

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cant remove my inlet manifold without removing egr housing on side of the block ours is a convertable using above method the right hand side of inlet manifold hits the egr housing by at least 20 mm and wont clear , so in process of removing side water egr housing
 

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Those swirl flaps are a great idea, bastardized by some cock awful engineering ....... Brunel would be spinning in his underpants if he saw them !
 

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They have prolly gone the same way as Raj said. They break off Get chewed up and Fa***d out the exhaust .
Another thing Raj said they were a bit of a known failure on the early TTID , and there were a couple of complete engine disintergrations, but modified in 2010
 

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got new one today from neo bros ,, looks slighty moddified on the swirl flaps .. quick question anybody have the torque settings for inlet manifold to block
 

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What a brilliant write up Raj..
Thank you for that...
On the Mercedes forum they used to bug up the holes by using the relevant sized drain plugs and bond them in permanently.. Some even drilled small holes and wired them in !(Aircraft style).
 

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On the Mercedes forum they used to bug up the holes by using the relevant sized drain plugs
They getting awl in a flap bout it ;)

Ya can get purpose made bungs made outta ally & toobes of goop to hold em in off of a well known auction site.....
Me.... I'd be tempted to replace them ...... Quite how I'd achieve this I dunno

My Tid, back in the day had its inlet fannymould changed at about 20K..... The cheeky Barstuards deemed it chargeable too! ..... I'd a been spewing thunder over that ..... But I am a grumpy git pon occasion ;)
 

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Hi Ray great write up. Thinking of attempting this on my saab 2008 Z19DTR Ttid. Bit nervous . Had the P2075 code thats been like it for 6 months. Coming up as inlet manifold valve . As its a second car I have the time to do it. Do you just take out the swirl flaps and conne t it all back up without any flaps at all . I was also told it could be the actuator itself giving me the error code. Is this easier to replace at first go at getting rid of the eml light.

Thanks Lee
 
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