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Sorry for creating a new topic here, but I need help and I figgured I'd get more viewers that might have the info I need this way. Anyways, here's the old thread:

So on to the new stuff: Dealer called me yesterday to report a complication! Not just one, but TWO of the studs are broken, changing the job from a 4-6 hour to 8-10! Ay, caramba!
! Is the dealer's labor quote on this reasonable??? If I go through with this it will cost me a fortune ($800-1000! ) I imagine the car is only worth $2-3000 (MY95 9000 CS 2.3 LPT manual 170hp - silver, grey cloth interior, foglights, moonroof, tape player, etc.) I'm starting to consider if it would be cheaper to buy a newer car than to keep my baby in good running order!
 

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Twice the time for two studs is unreasonable IMO. Most of the hassle factor is involved in the preparation to get at the studs. 4-6 hours soudns a fair time to take the head off, get it in a jig, drill and use a stud extractor. The actual stud extraction should take no more than 30 minutes.
 

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I completely agree with Mark's opinion. Your mechanic is trying to get as much money as he can from you. You've got a SAAB ! So, very often, you MUST pay the "right" to have it or to keep it. Nearly each time my father ( since he bought my 9000 on 88' ) has to pay a lot to keep it and the job done wasn't so fine as the engine broke at 120k kilometers. And as I have no choice, I've paid 3700 USD for a used engine, wich causes me later a lot of troubles, because the job wasn't done properly at a saab dealer. So, I DIY all the job now, no more so called hours spent on my car. So, my advice is to DIY as much as you can, aven by learning everything if you need. And you'll find all the help needed here, as there's really brilliant members, helpfull and often more qualified than most of the techs I have to deal with. Maybe it's only the case in france, but my engine was changed in the netherlands ! KEEP ON SAABIN, don't be discouraged ! It's a question of men, not a question of car ! Laurent
 

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Having replaced an exhaust manifold stud myself, I can confirm that it is actually easier than it first appears.

Basically, give yourself plenty of room to work by removing underside guards, radiator, oil cooler intercooler and associated pipes and grille.

Use cobalt drills on slow speed setting, followed by "easy-out" type stud extractor with lots of spray down through hole to get at back of threads.

Put plenty of copper grease on threads when re-assembling.

Hardest part is re-assembly of turbo and exhaust intersection, bit fiddly getting everything to line up.

Agree with Rhino & Laurent, no need to get head off (unless you suspect timing chain rattle or gasket failure), and the car is definitely worth the effort.


Good luck, and if you need a fuller procedure, I can write one up from memory, but is based on MY96 2.0LPT with intercooler and oil cooler.

Pete
 
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