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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to get the rubber gear-linkage coupler out of my Aero to implement this Saab TSB.

The pinch bolt to the lever end of the linkage isn't an issue, having had to slacken it to adjust the alignment every time Abbott Racing have had the box out


However, the other end is secured to the selector shaft on the gearbox by a small through-bolt. I can get the 8mm nut and washer off it, but can't get the bolt out. I can't get close enough to see whether there's a way of turning the head and I've tried tapping it gently with a hammer to no avail.

Has anyone done this and can tell me what I'm missing?
 

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BillJ, I'm just wondering is this pin similar to the pin that was used on the 99 gear linkage in that it is a tapered pin and only has the thread on the narrow end. If so, SAAB had a special little tool, which, when the nut was removed, used to go around the linkage and by means of tightening a bolt in the said tool, 'pressed' the pin out.
Hope this is some help
Cheers
 

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I have used Injectie's method and the results varied. You have to be careful how hard you hit the nut - if hit too hard, it may be difficult to get the nut off, once the tapered pin is loosened. It's a very confining area to be swinging a hammer, too. Also, I hate banging on things that are attached to sensitive items like the shift rod. Another method I've been sucessful with is putting a nut, larger than the head of the tapered pin, over the wide end of the pin, and a C-clamp, purchased on both the partially threaded nut, and the larger nut on the opposite end. When the C-clamped is tightened, the pin breaks free with no impact on the rod.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, guys. I didn't realise it was a tapered pin. At least now I know what I'm dealing with. I managed to swing a hammer against it, but not very hard.

Another method I've been sucessful with is putting a nut, larger than the head of the tapered pin, over the wide end of the pin, and a C-clamp, purchased on both the partially threaded nut, and the larger nut on the opposite end.[/QB][/b]
Thanks, Bob. You mean you actually found room to get a clamp on it?

I'll give it another go tomorrow evening. I've been having the vibration for at least a couple of years and it's been getting worse. It's really bad now (probably due to the modifications). My goal is to get it sorted for the Wales meet and Anglesey track day next weekend.
 

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Before I start banging the pin I always chech if I have e reserve on the shelf.
The special tool that was mentioned is just terrible to use. Some pins are so tight that the tool snaps and the pins stay in place. Happened to me twice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Originally posted by Injectie:
[qb]These pins can be really difficult to remove.[/qb][/b]
I found that out for myself tonight. The pin is still there, although the nut will no longer go on the threads. I reckon it's safe enough as the pin doesn't look like it will be going anywhere


I tried the clamp/nut method (damaged two clamps) and even tried hitting the end of the clamp while it was tightened in an effort to shock the taper free.

Any other suggestions? I'd really like to have it done for the weekend, but that's looking less likely now.
 

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Bill, did you try soaking the thing with a good penetrating oil - not WD-40, but a good machine-shop grade penetrating oil? If you can't get the nut back on, I would soak the pin a few times and have another go at it with the hammer. If you have access to an impact air-tool, I'm sure that would work, but it would be very tricky aligning the pointed tip on the threaded end of the pin.
 

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Hi Bill
I don't know whether this will help.
Your problem takes me back to my MGB/C days many years ago when I had a seized gear linkage problem and lack of space to manoeuvre. I solved it by getting dry ice (memory tells me from a chemical /gas company)and carefully packing small chunks into a bit of cloth and then wrapping that around the linkage. It did the trick by "shrinking" parts by just enough to gain movement. Maybe this line of thought could assist you, careful with the dry ice if you can get it, it will take your skin off!

Regards

green9000
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks, Green9000. That's a really good idea. In the electronics industry, we use freezer spray to cool components for faultfinding. That stuff can easily generate low enough temperatures to cause frostbite and damage (crack) electronic components if not used sensibly. Perhaps I should try generous application of that on the pin with clamping pressure applied?

I may leave it until after the weekend now, since I don't want to risk doing any damage that would preclude the car from the Anglesey track day. In the highly unlikely event that it now decides to come free on its own, I'm carrying the new pin and nut in the car along with an 8mm spanner.
 
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