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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been on the lookout for some of this grease since my sharp, Saab learning curve, started early this year.

Perhaps it is readily available in the UK. (in which case this is a useless post) However I saw in today for sale in Oz.

Marketed by Permatex, it is a small sachet for the cost of a pint of (cold) beer.

Long live my DI cassette
 

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Are you refering to the Krytox grease for the D.I.Pac.
I can get you the part number if you req. A lot more than a cost of a pint though . £ 30-32 pound a tube about 3-4" long. This is a must every time you remove the DI PAC.
 

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Not much use to you, Ian, but I use it in aerosol form (much easier to apply) and it costs £3.99 from Maplin (a UK high-street electronics supplier) for 250ml. They call it Silicone grease, but it's made for applications like this and I believe it's the same thing.

I'm sure Maplin don't actually make it, but I don't know who does. They also sell it via their web site.
Maplin Silicone Grease
 

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Dielectric grease is a non-conducting grease. I think it's called silicone grease these days. Anyway, silicone grease should be OK for temperature.

The description is:
"Has high insulating and water-repellent properties, good thermal conductivity and is a reasonable mechanical lubricant. It has no adverse effect on most commonly used materials. The grease's technical properties meet the requirements of DEF 59-10.

Temperature range: -50°C to +200°C."

Source
RS components £3.61 per 100g tube.
 

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A number of years ago I worked in the offshore oil business with underwater vehicles. We routinely applied silicon grease to all connectors at all voltages, many of which were regularly immersed in sea water. It reduced corrosion dramatically.
Ever since I have used it on all connectors on my motorcycles including the spark plug connectors to keep the water out with excellent results. Silicone grease is the very thing for the DI pack and also any connectors on the car which are subject to damp conditions.
Buy the RS or Maplin stuff and save a load money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I heard about the positive attributes of dialectic grease from either the Townsend or Quasimotors site. Thanks for the feedback, I didn't know it had other names, or there were products with the same qualities.

The one sachet was enough to do the Saab and both ends of all the leads on my V8 MG.

You chaps have probably forgotten what a distributor looks like

Let alone a Kettering ignition system
 

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One word of caution. As stated..:

The description is:
"Has high insulating and water-repellent properties[/b]
Whilst good for preventing rubber cups at base of DI unit from perishing, and assisting seal to prevent moisture ingress to DI pack ( is this really a problem? - feedback appreciated ), don't get any between spark plug top and DI connector! Or you insulate the electrical path to the plugs, affecting the DI pack performance! The HT (40KV) will almost certainly break through any silicon grease, but the spark will be reduced.

Silicon oil is banned from use on aircraft, as it has a very low surface tension. This causes the silicon oil to creep. If it gets onto switches or other low voltage electrical contacts, it basically prevents contact and hence breaks the circuit!
 

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I think the idea on the DI unit is to help seal the ends to keep out the water vapour in the air and so prevent condensation forming on the plugs when they cool. Seems a bit belt and braces though.
 
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