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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this was covered in a thread recently.. but can someone with experience remind me where to apply Copper Grease (or similar alternatives) when fitting new break pads?

Obviously, it is applied to rear of pad assembly.

(I heard a rumour that it reduces brake pad wear if applied to pad fascias
, but this may result in large cracks appearing all over the vehicle!! )

Any other 'serious' recommendations and/or 'tips' on fitting the pads?

Do pistons normally 'go back in easily'?

Haven't read Haynes manual yet, but do pistons press back in or wind back in?

What is the typical job time? (45 min per wheel?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good question, Pete!

Fronts.

I also plan to replace front disks.

Is there any virtue applying Copper grease to the part of the disk which buts up to the wheel hub, to aid future removal and prevent corrosion between the two surfaces?

Is the disk securing screw normally fairly easy to remove? (NB: the car is a '98 with very little corrosion evident.)

I will be aided by a rubber lump hammer!
 

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Paul, have a look on my web site, where there are illustrated procedures for replacing the front and rear pads and discs, along with many others. The front pistons press back into the caliper, but the rears wind back. They can be pressed back, but they'll never work again


I've found that if the standard pads have a rubbery backing pad on them, they will not squeal, even without copper grease.
This doesn't seem to be the case with the Mintex C-Tech fast road pads I've just fitted , so I'll be taking them off to apply copper grease this weekend.
Where the edges of the backing plate slide in the caliper seem to be important for applying copper grease.

The little Torx screw on the front disc can be a pig to remove. The best method seems to be not to try just using a Torx driver, but go straight at it with an impact driver. That way, you get best purchase on it without damaging the head. Failing that, try to get some penetrating oil to the back of it (it goes into an open hole and that is where the corrosion gets in). I don't think there's access, though. A final resort is to drill the head off and forget about it. One screw (the wheel locating stud) is enough to hold the disc. It's the wheel bolts that do all the work in service.

And copper grease between the disc and hub is a good idea. I haven't had a problem with corrosion, but some others have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Bill.

>>A final resort is to drill the head off and forget about it.

Did that once on a VW many years ago, for the same reason. Hoping that my 9000's will come out though, and maybe will invest in an impact driver first off. Or get the wife to hit my through rod Torx driver with a hammer as I try to turn it! Could be interesting!
 

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If the torx screw is tight hit it square on with a hammer several times hard. This has a similar affect as an impact driver by breaking the rust on the threads. I do this all the time at work and is usually very effective.

Neil
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Opps!
Wonder what Sigmund Freud would make of that!!

By the way Bill, thanks for the very useful info on your website re-brakes, tools, etc. Much appreciated!

I agree with the 20 min (40 minute novice) timescales to do the actual brakes replacements. But in terms of elapsed time I would say that...; allowing for preparing all tools, jacking car, applying axle stands, carefull cleaning of existing calipers (etc), checking tyres for nails/wear (etc) prior to refitting, cleaning new disks of any protective coating, checking brake pipes, CV boots, piston seals, etc. and all the other associated jobs whilst each wheel is off, will take a good 1 hour for each wheel!

And then of course the test drive(!), clearing up, sweeping drive of brake dust/rust, putting tools away, and binning old pads/disks. It all adds up
 

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If the torx screw is tight hit it square on with a hammer several times hard. This has a similar affect as an impact driver by breaking the rust on the threads. I do this all the time at work and is usually very effective.[/b]
A good tip Neil -also very effective for loosening seized bleed nipples.
 

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Originally posted by Derek:
[qb]QUOTE
If the torx screw is tight hit it square on with a hammer several times hard. This has a similar affect as an impact driver by breaking the rust on the threads. I do this all the time at work and is usually very effective.[/b]
A good tip Neil -also very effective for loosening seized bleed nipples.[/qb][/b][/quote]Eek!
I should be very careful there or you'll mushroom your nipples and block up their ...errmm... nozzles!
 
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