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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just installed a new clutch and trans. now it's all back together and i'm having problems getting the clutch line back in order. they say i have to pressurise the line..... i cant find a kit or aneything to help me do that. my friends have said they had cars that "need" to be pressurised but they got away with just bleeding the heck out of it. they also said i could find an extra brake/clutch fluid cap and put a bike needle in it and use a bike pump to keep pressure on the line... i guess it worked..

oh well, i just want to drive my car. i never have. your comments will be read and appriciated.

thaks
 

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I've had difficulty bleeding the clutch on my 9000 in the past even when using a Gunsons EasyBleed. What the problem is, I think, is that the exit pipe from the master cylinder is at the lowest point of the unit and if it is full of air, even the flow induced by pressurising the reservoir will not carry the air out. I found that I had to lift the front of the car up as high as it would go. I took it to a garage and put the front wheels only on the ramp. Lifted until tow bar touched the ground then bled the clutch. Sorted in about 10 seconds. I had used about 2 litres fluid trying previously.
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Take a spare radiator expasnsion tank cap, double up the rubber washer and fit a schreader valve in the top and then you can use a bicyle pump to pressureise the system[/b]
similar idea, but different end result... i did not have a spare cap lying around and i wasn't ready to pay the $7 shipping for a $2 part. rather than using an expansion tank cap with a hole drilled (which was my original plan) i used a section of a bicycle inner tube, cut the tube about 2 inches away from the valve on either side, split the tube along the opposite side of the valve, use a hose clamp to hold the rubber tube with valve tightly on top of the expansion chamber. of course, be careful not to tighten the hose clamp too much, as it would break the plastic tank.

this will also prevent one from applying too much pressure to the system. i understand that if the expansion tank is pressurized too much, that one would risk damaging the seals on the clutch master and slave cylinders. the flexibility of the inner tube will allow the tube to 'bubble' above the expansion tank, thus preventing an excessive pressure build up. worked a charm bleeding out the system on my c900 after clutch line replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yeah thanks guys. i was already thinking about trying something close to what xassh was talking about. it is a bit tricky all the same. why did they make it so hard? well i geuss the worst case would be driving around with a bike needle in my cap all the time. something i can live with


thanks guys. thats the last thing holding me up from driving my 86 9000. i'm new to the saab world and baught it on the simple fact that it was turbocharged. i'm learning and loving alot more aobut these cars as i go. i'll keep you up to date on my first drive when it comes time.
 

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the shape/safety factor/handling/uniqueness of the Saab didnt do anything for you?

i would not recommend using the bicycle valve method drilled into the only brake/clutch fluid reservoir cap that you have. i know not whether having an air leak at the reservoir could cause clutch problems, if the valve were to come loose. if you have a spare cap or can source one at a good price, by all means go for it. otherwise, i would recommend using an alternate method.

i did not want to risk contanimating the fluid when i had to bleed my clutch line, hence the developement of the method i came up with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
like i was saying, i baught it because it was turbocharged. i'm learning and loving alot more about them then just that. my friends race Ford 2.3 turbo driven cars. i'll be looking forward to showing them a little Saab power
 

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I know you've sorted it now but 1 way tat always works effectively to bleed a clutch is this.

Get a small hand pump oil can and fill with brake fluid, attach some small hose to the nozzle and then put it on the bleed nipple of the slave. Remove the reservoir cap to see the level, crack off the bleed nipple and pump away. I always find backbleeding the system like this works very effectively and is pretty quick. You just watch for the bubbles rising in the reservoir and the level raising. Sometimes you need to pump the clutch pedal a few times as well, but it's never failed for me.
 
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