Saabscene Saab Forum - Saab Technical Information Resource banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,895 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear all,

Please observe the pictures below...





Can't shift the bleed nipple screw one iota. Obviously the calipers are pretty corroded as can be seen. Should I give up in order to prevent killing the calipers entirely and start saving for some new ones or proceed at my own risk?

Also, my chassis flexes like hell!! I dropped the car onto the Axel stands on lowest settings and the chassis flexed so much one of the front wheels couldn't be removed because it was touching the floor! Is this normal? My mate Nick was't impressed and reckoned the chassis is poorly designed. I know the 9000 chassis is very flexible and designed to ensure the car can be driven safely to a stop in the event of tyre blowouts ... but


(Admittedly this is the first time I've used my Axel stands properly.
)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,172 Posts
If you proceed with your mission all that could go wrong is the bleed nipple will shear above the threads leaving the tapered seal at the bottom intact,So if all fails you will not lose your brakes!

Edit: Have you tried to tighten them slightly to brake the seal?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Not directly on topic, but can't agree chassis poor. Wasn't aware of it being specifically designed to allow you to deal with blow outs. But I wrote off my first 9000 on the motorway (at or around the speed limit of course...) following a big time drivers side blow out, and walked away with little more than a scratch and blown eardrums from the airbag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,895 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, eventually the front nipples became free and I managed to bleed them without any issues. However, the rear calipers are worse still, there's no trace of the original nut on the bleed screw it's corroded off completely, so I've not been able to bleed the rear brakes.

This is pretty annoying, I'm absolutely spent out at the moment and the last thing I need to be doing is replacing the rear calipers.

Originally posted by Mark R:
[qb]Not directly on topic, but can't agree chassis poor. Wasn't aware of it being specifically designed to allow you to deal with blow outs. But I wrote off my first 9000 on the motorway (at or around the speed limit of course...) following a big time drivers side blow out, and walked away with little more than a scratch and blown eardrums from the airbag. [/qb][/b]
I think my friend may have preconceived ideas, just wanting to make sure my car is within tolerance and not likely to fall apart anytime soon. It was crashed at a track day last year, although there was no apparent structural damage at the time, it's always an idea to make sure. Especially as I have plans to spend a considerable amount of money tuning it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,343 Posts
Originally posted by Mark R:
[qb]Not directly on topic, but can't agree chassis poor.  [/qb][/b]
I am sure that I have read before that the rear seat back is fixed in the 9000 CD/CDE precisely because the car is too flexible.

Every single Saab I have owned has been flexible in this respect. Drive a classic 900 so that one front wheel goes up onto the kerb and you can hear all the door rubbers creaking as the body flexes.


Like you say, Mark R, this is getting off topic, so feel free to start a new thread. In the meantime, we ought to get back to Jason's original observation about his brake calipers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,172 Posts
there's no trace of the original nut on the bleed screw it's corroded off completely, so I've not been able to bleed the rear brakes.[/b]
You could always try a pair of mole-grips on the rear nipples to free them! got to be worth a try

Edit: why did I say "mole-grips" I meant Vice-Grips as they are far superior
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
You may have to use something like stillsons to remove the old rear bleed nipples - these will dig in and grip more the more effort that is applied rather than slip. Suggest they are then replaced with new ones with a larger nut size. For some reason Saab fit 7mm ones which do not stand up to much use/leverage even though they are not done up tight. You can fit the same size as the front, 8mm which will last longer. Get them from a car accessory shop, about 50p each, or from Saab, about £3 each but this will include the rubber cap (will need to specify large nut or they will supply 7mm). You will need to take an old one with you to match the thread size.
When the wheels are off it is always worth checking the bleed nipples have not seized rather than wait for the bi-annual fluid change.

Jason, from your picture it is hard to tell where you placed the axle stand at the front. I normally use the rear butterfly bush or just behind and usually leave the jack in place. I have not noticed any flexing - except most cars I have had when jacked up at the front the nearest door has not shut quite as normal and the Saab is no different with slight catching on the latch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,895 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I positioned the Axel stands on the outermost jack points NOT on the wishbones. I see your point, without supporting the wishbone above it's pivot point some movement is to be expected. BUT, this WAS following the Haynes manual ... so is it a bad idea and is it possible to damage the chassis by doing this?

This is going a little off-topic so I may open a new thread if there's enough material here for a full discussion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,277 Posts
Are the Saab points only really for emergency wheel changes by the owner at the roadside (using the cheap easily stowable jack supplied)?
If you look at it like that then the position they are placed in is dictated more by their ease of use by the most non-technical/non-skilled person in foul weather at night etc. etc. rather than where they will be best placed for raising the vehicle structually.

Nick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,172 Posts
Back on topic! you still have the option of drilling the old bleed nipples out of the calliper using a slightly undersized drill and then replacing the nipples with new ones,or stripping the callipers down and and using heat to remove the nipples!
Got to be cheaper than new rear callipers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
393 Posts
This is slightly off topic, but it'll (hopefully) make you smile. To improve your brakes all you have to do is to spend a sunday afternoon taking each wheel off in turn and simply painting the calipers red. I watched with great amusement while the lad across the road did this to his Honda Civic type R, and better still his friend (with matching Civic) was there doing the same thing. Fantastic! Who'd have thought improving your brakes could be so simple and cheap. I must give it a try.........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
Slightly too late I'm afraid (I've been on holiday) but seized in nipples often respond to a sharp tap with a hammer before attempting to loosen them. Not too hard so as you bend them or bur the ends too much. It seems to break the rust bond between the nipple and the caliper. Where-ever posible try to use the correct size of deep socket to loosen them.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top