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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thought I'd share with you all my experience of removing one of these 'beauties' from my '96 2.3 LPT, 125K miles.

It took me most of Sunday to do it, learning as I went. I only disassembled the throttle housing & IAC plus a few hoses to get to the job, but didn't need to touch anything like fuel lines or injector wiring. The mating surfaces to the manifold casting and the short block needed a lot of cleaning up - v. fine wet & dry did the job.

I decided to get the shorter manifold bolts for reassembly and was glad I did. The alternative would have been using the existing longer bolts plus 6 washers on each to pack them out. I think with my butterfingers I would have sprayed a few washers around the engine bay (certainly if doing the lower bolts) because access was limited, so was glad I went for the short option.

I did a coolant change at the same time as this job, & so decided to check the thermostat whilst everything was disassembled, and was again glad I did. The inner rubber sealing ring was solid and perished, and there was just a smattering of gasket sealant (& no gasket) on the outer casing. How there had been no coolant leaks I don't know.

With everything back together, I did a run. My first impression was that the car simply ran smoother. Pulling through 3rd and 4th at between 2500-3500 rpm, I found that momentum was more easily sustained, particularly uphill - basically it felt like the car just got to 70mph quicker than before. The pick-up in speed actually seemed closer to my Dad's 9-3, which is no slouch.

So that's it. Can't be any more scientific than that, other than to say I think it's been a worthwhile job, and I'm more confident on my overtaking manoeuvres!
 

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I checked my 96 2.0LPT and it doesn't have either the fuse OR the extra thick gasket so I dont have to go through the process (which from what you write doesn't sound too horrible)

Does anyone know if there is any logic in which cars have it and which ones dont.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's a pure guess, but perhaps Saab fitted batches of vehicles on the production line, allocating them to certain markets where low temperatures were expected? Because as I understand it from elsewhere on this site, heatplates were fitted to improve extreme cold starting & possibly emissions.

Maybe Saab thought at production time that the UK was deemed as a cold region (in Scandinavian terms!), hence a few made their way over here with plates fitted?

As I say, just a guess, then again could be rubbish. Or then again, maybe at production time somebody said, "Oi, what shall we do with these spare heatplates guv'ner?"
 
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