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I am about to be a first time Saab owner. I'm currently looking at 2 1995 Saab Aeros (one with 92000 miles and one with 91000). I was just wondering if there was anything specific to look out for in these two models. As this will be my first Saab, I'm a newb... very excited though

Thanks
 

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I bought a 1996 with 88k miles and was looking out for the following:

1) Manual Gearbox (personal choice)- (225bhp as opposed to 200)
2) Has the clutch been changed yet (nice if its just been done)
3) Does the gearbox crunch or complain when flooring between 2nd and 3rd / any whining
4) Is the service history spot on/can fluid changes be well proven - if its just had 90k service then all the better.
5) Does it have TCS / can you switch it off (if it does and you can't then be wary as it seems to cause a lot of potential issues)
6) Has it been thrashed/feel sloppy- its interesting to look at the mpg when you get in the car - if its way below 30 then they haven't been hanging around (very subjective of course especially if its been city driving)
7) Oil/coolant contamination due to gasket leaks

When I bought mine it needed new rear shocks, which is not normal at that mileage (so I am told - but it had spent most of its life on narrow country roads) - the handling was pretty poor until fixed. The turbo boost gauge should at least touch into the red or reach the end of the yellow section at full throttle. I didnt know this when I bought mine and the boost only went up to half way through the yellow due to a leaking hose (£5) - only the gauge was affected, not the main boost.
Once you get the car, make sure you run 97/98 ron fuel (optimax preferably) and go for an adaptation run (see other posts). If the owner is not an enthusiast and runs 95Ron its unlikely to have been done for ages. The difference
in mine was marked to say the least.

I'm sure I've missed loads so I'll hand over to anyone else - especially '95 specific stuff (TCS??)
 

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Hi and Welcome to Saabscene mr0range!

I am a new owner of a Saab (about 6 months); infact it was my first car. Don't know much about the Aero. Generally for such a high power car, look for the car having been thrashed as chances are high with it. General tips on buying a Saab 9000 on BillJ's site (very good guide by Roger Whiteman) at

http://www.saab9000.com/information/buying/buying.html

and the 9000 buyer's guide from www.saabtrader.co.uk is quoted below for you


1. General Points
The Saab 9000 is one of the most under rated cars ever built. It has huge carry capacity, massive build strength, and in turbo form, it's one of the quickest cars on the road.
The 9000, if driven carefully, will also give excellent mpg. Servicing is straightforward. If your budget and insurance allows, go for a Turbo, which is much more fun to drive and can do the same mpg as an injection.



2. Engine
Sharing many of the same components as the 16V 900 engine, it is straightforward to work on.
As with 900's, check for timing chain problems.
Early turbos (1985-90) can be hard to change. Regular oil changes are essential to prolong turbo and engine life.
2.3 litre engines (1989-93) have a balance shaft system, later used on 9000 engines from 1994 onwards.
Listen when cold for timing chain noise, and when hot for a lighter less rhythmic noise indicating balancer chain or sprocket wear. If this is present it needs to be rectified as soon as possible.
Should the balancer chain break it could damage the timing chain, which can destroy the head, which could be very expensive.



3. Transmission
Early gearboxes can suffer many problems, but were gradually improved over the following years.
Automatic gearboxes are just the same, and again improved on the later cars. An oil cooler is incorporated into the engine radiator. Check the colour of the gearbox oil, if it is milky the rad is leaking coolant into the gearbox. This will cause the gearbox to fail.

A complete reconditioned manual gearbox will cost £500-1000 fitting around 5-6 hours.
Automatic reconditioned gearboxes cost approx. £850-1500 and 6-8 labour.
If there is a lot of play in the gearstick check the damper between the stick and gearbox.
If on driving there feels a lot vibration /wobble on acceleration, inner drive shaft joints may need to be examined, and replaced as necessary.



4. Body
Surprisingly, the Saab 9000 can look a little frayed around the edges. Doors and wings can all show corrosion but it is normally superficial. Later 9000's don't seem to suffer so badly.
The Griffin is most well appointed with every extra listed as standard, even including rear air-conditioning.
Interiors wear very well. Even with high mileages the seats don't sag. Leather is very hard wearing and a must if you have small kids.
Interior fan resisters can fail with only the 4-speed working, but is cheap to replace.
Also check the A/C, if fitted, works correctly. It may just need a gas top up or could be something more serious.



5. Suspension and Steering
Firstly check the power steering when cold. If it is heavy but lightens when the engine warms, it's suffering from morning sickness. A reconditioned rack should cost about £170 and fitting about 3 hours.
Next check the steering column. If you hold the wheel and rock it side to side you should not feel any play. If play is present it may just need adjusting, half hour or more serious a new collapsible support.
On the front, wishbone bushes need replacing regularly, costing approx. £25.00 each and 1 hour labour, and the same for rear anti-roll bar bushes at approx. £10.00 each and half hour labour.
Brakes are very good , although rear callipers become non-adjustable and need replacing, approx. £150 parts and 1 hour labour.
C/V joints can be noisy the same as 900's and again £100 parts and 1 hour labour.
ABS fitted to 9000's are generally OK. An ABS light that stays on is normally traced to nearside front wheel speed sensors costing approx. £100 parts and 1.5 hours labour.

Hope this helps. I am sure Aero owners will give you Aero specific advice.

Happy SAAB-ing


Cheers,
Neel.
 
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