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Discussion Starter #1
So, since last week, the Aero now has:

New battery
NOT a New DI pack - still the old one - it's a long story...
Poly rear AR-bar bushes
New Dump valve
Non-leaking T close to the washer bottle
Elkparts/JR induction kit
Dash cup/coin holder
Made in Trollhatten by Trolls sticker

It feels a little better!

Poly bushes went on fine - and instantly give balance and re-assurence that I haven't had in the Aero before.

Biggest problem getting the induction kit on was persuading the cone filter to stay on the end of the slippery aluminium tube - I found it easier to mount the cone to the tube BEFORE feeding them both up from below the bumper, contrary to what the instructions said. Nice blue anodised tube too - matches the silicon

Tried an atmospheric valve for a couple of days, as one made itself available, and the standard one was leaking - a bit loud for me (double decker bus brakes...). Had no tickover or running problems, but the car ran so rich I could smell it from the cabin (particularly as I was driving with the windows down a bit to hear the WOOOSH).

So a recirculating one went on, which with the induction kit, is much more the noise level I was hoping for. Overall sound is 'rortier' - plenty of turbo whistle, and a PHEWWWW noise (not a WOOOSH or a PHSSSST - are you with me?). Noise levels are still far below standard Scoobies I've driven, and I'm guessing markedly less than induction kits on 9-3s, which I would put down to the cone being tucked away in the wing, as far away from the cabin as possible, where a 9-3 puts the cone in the engine bay.

The unexpected benefit of all this was much improved traction - the car squatts less under power; the fresh dump valve reduces (effective) lag, and the induction kit (reputedly) reduces low-down torque, and replaces it with top-end power, all of which translates into MUCH more controlable delivery, and a happier me

A final note of thanks to Justin at Elkparts, who got the bits to me in time for the long-weekend, and to A and A Saab, for supply of items and 'known good' bits for diagnosis.

Hope to see you all next weekend in Tamworth.

Carl
 

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Nice one, Carl


Strange that your car didn't like the atmospheric dump valve, I thought they were OK on T5 cars. IMHO understated performance is the name of the game with Saabs anyway

Must get you to tell us the story behind your 'handle' (unless you already have and I've mussed it )

Cheers

James
 

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You had instructions? Care to share them for what they might be?

I have one from elkparts but it definately has no instructions whatsoever. I could ask them to fax them if you can't stick 'em on here.



David.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You had instructions? Care to share them for what they might be?[/b]
For what they were worth, yes.

They are hand-written translations from the Swedish, with tiny photos, and all they say is things such as: "raise the car" - "remove the under-spoiler" - "remove the airbox"...

Literally the only piece of real guidence is that you should mount the tube before adding the filter cone, and on that point, I disagreed with them!

In case it helps, from my experience:

get the air box into as many separate pieces as possible in-situ (there are 'pressure clips', spring clips and screws to undo)

the thinner end of the tube goes into the existing induction tubing

mount the cone onto the tube before inserting it from beneath

you need to suply your own nut and bolt to attach the tube mount to one of the empty mounting points used by the airbox (I used the rear-most one)

they supply 3 metal tie-wrap things (name escapes me), but even replacing the one at the end of the existing flexi-pipe, I only used 2 of them

That's it!

Rorty - snorty Saab on your driveway.


Carl
 

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Thanks guys, not sure how much that helps at the moment, I can't recognise half the big tubes with open ends on those pics!

I'll figure something out though when I come round to do it.

David.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Evening, David.

The photos are misleading when it comes to the 'tubes' - the only one I had to remove was the hard 'cap' end of the airbox cover, that you can access from the engine bay.

I just undid the metal strap thing (what ARE they called?) and separated it from the 'flexi' pipe that grows from the turbo, past the dump valve re-circulation link.

It's this flexi pipe that lets you re-join the intake system when you have removed the air box from the inner wing, and mounted the aluminium tube and cone filter that form the induction kit proper.

I didn't have to remove the dump valve as they seem to have (for photographic purposes?), nor did I remove the indicator assembly, as they suggest you might.

The whole process took me around 2.5 hours, including junior-hacksawing off two of the under-spoiler mounting bolts, and finding / fabricating replacements - and I have so little skill in these areas that I don't even know what the goddamn metal clip-strap thingies are called!

Carl
 

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I think you mean the Jubilee clips?

As soon as I saw removal of the lower plastic fairing I thought, uh oh! because I know what to expect there with seized/spinning nuts. Fortunately, i've bought a bag full of replacement Jacknuts, genuine Saab ones too but I don't feel that motivated right now.

David.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Jubilee clips


Further to the fitment: I was sceptical about stories of improved economy with JR filters/induction kits, but since fitting mine (and despite the fun I've been having with my right-foot, listening to the new noises made) the car is notably better on the juice. It should be mentioned that the paper filter I took out was pretty well used.

As a test I reset the fuel readout and drove it
for a spell (10 miles-ish) - result? 14MPG


Then reset and tried the route again in a restrained manner. result? 36MPG

Then reset and drove as 'normally' as I could (making progress, but allowing myself the occasional overtake/bit of
) - result? 30MPG - and this is confirmed with my normal commuter route of lanes/motorway/lanes again, as I currently show 30.1MPG, 60 miles into a tankful.

I normally expect to see around 28MPG, and time will tell if I continue to see improvement, but the range of 14-36MPG seems bigger than previously, and fits with the concept of improved airflow aiding performance at one end, and economy at the other.

Carl
 
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